Study could unlock fresh aquaculture capacity
2017-10-31 15:57:56   copyfrom:    hits:

A collaborative project to improve understanding of the effects of salmon farming on the seabed in high-energy wa

A collaborative project to improve understanding of the effects of salmon farming on the seabed in high-energy waters is underway in Orkney.

The three-year project will help inform the environmental monitoring and management of more exposed sites along Scotland’s west coast and the Northern Isles and, potentially, unlock additional capacity. It is being co-funded by the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC) and sees Cooke Aquaculture Scotland partner with researchers from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) and Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia.

Currently, the benthic impacts of salmon farming – the impact of fish waste or uneaten feed on the seabed – are monitored by industry regulator, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), using the DEPOMOD model developed by SAMS, which is based largely on data gathered from sheltered, in-shore sea lochs.

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